Nuclear family - nuclear family


Children born into a marriage tend to have more stability than children born into cohabitation. Pew Research Center found that 20 percent of kids born to married parents experience divorce, while nearly 50 percent of kids in cohabiting families experience divorce. Both of these groups of children have a better chance to one day live with a married couple than kids born to single moms. Committed spouses or partners model a loving, caring, and supportive relationship for their children. This translates into future success when children learn how to seek positive relationships and interact well with others. Children see partners work together to solve problems, delegate household responsibilities, and support one another through positive and negative issues.

An estranged father and son are re-united at a wedding party. However, a thunderstorm traps them in a cabin, forcing the family to reveal deeper secrets.

1846, "of or like the nucleus of a cell," from nucleus + -ar , probably by influence of French nucléaire . Use in atomic physics is from 1914; of weapons, from 1945. Hence nuclear physics (1933), nuclear energy (1941), nuclear war (1954). Nuclear winter coined by Richard Turco, but first attested in article by Carl Sagan in "Parade" magazine, Oct. 30, 1983. General sense of "central" is from 1912. Nuclear family , originally a sociologists' term, is first attested 1949 in "Social Structure," by American anthropologist . Murdock (1897-1985). Alternative adjective nucleal is recorded from 1840.


Nuclear Family - Nuclear FamilyNuclear Family - Nuclear FamilyNuclear Family - Nuclear FamilyNuclear Family - Nuclear Family

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